Four Myths About Learning Disabilities

Feb 18, 2014 by Hallie Smith, MA CCC-SLP

Learning differences or disabilities are frequently misunderstood. Symptoms of specific learning disabilities can be complex and confusing, and may look more like behavioral problems than learning problems to some. But some of the most common myths about learning disabilities are easy to dispel with a look at the facts.

Flipping the Classroom for Students With Learning Disabilities

Feb 11, 2014 by Norene Wiesen

For many teachers, the words “flipped classroom” are nothing more than a synonym for having students watch pre-recorded lesson videos at home and then do related assignments – formerly homework – during class time. There’s no doubt that that is exactly what the flipped classroom typically looks like on the surface. But when flip teaching is done right, what matters is that it uses time differently and more effectively, in ways that can profoundly benefit all learners, including students with learning disabilities.

Right vs. Left Brained + Autism, APD, ADHD Neuroscience and More

Feb 4, 2014 by Carrie Gajowski, MA

Our annual Visionary Conference for clinical providers takes place February 21-22, and like last year, the conference is open to anyone interested in attending. Get all the info on speakers and sessions here!

Remediation vs. Accommodation: Helping Students with Learning Disabilities Succeed

Jan 28, 2014 by Norene Wiesen

Meeting the needs of students with learning disabilities can be a challenge. Students newly identified with a learning disability are likely to need immediate accommodation. But for maximum long-term benefit, educators need to address the learning difficulty at its core. How do we strike the right balance between remediation and accommodation?

What the Common Core Standards Mean for Special Education Students

Jan 21, 2014 by Hallie Smith, MA CCC-SLP

The Common Core standards are considered challenging for general education learners - and they’re meant to be. But given that challenge, many educators wonder what it means to hold special education students to the same standards. How are educators expected to get underperforming students to proficiency?

8 Ways To Build Student Stamina

Jan 14, 2014 by Norene Wiesen

Students who have mastered persistence are able to work through challenges, deal constructively with failures and adversity, and achieve the goals they have set for themselves. Try these tips for boosting your learners’ stick-to-itiveness.

5 Trends in Education for 2014

Jan 7, 2014 by Norene Wiesen

The inclusion of listening standards in the Common Core heralds a new focus on listening instruction in the classroom. In 2014, teachers will spend more time demonstrating what listening “looks like;” explaining what students should be doing with their eyes, ears, and bodies while listening; directing learners to notice when they haven’t been listening; and measuring how well learners apply what they’ve been taught. What other education trends are predicted for 2014?

The Benefits of Downtime: Why Learners’ Brains Need a Break

Dec 17, 2013 by Hallie Smith, MA CCC-SLP

With so much to do and so little learning time in a school year—fitting in downtime is easier said than done. That’s unfortunate, because research shows that time off-task is important for proper brain function and health.

Monitoring Progress in RTI: The Importance of Targeted Intervention

Dec 10, 2013 by Chris Weber, Ed.D
RtI and the practices associated with it are among the most research-proven strategies a school can engage. But just implementing RtI-based practices is not enough. We must ensure that RtI is resulting in improved student outcomes.

Child Development Versus Standards-Driven Learning: Who Wins?

Dec 3, 2013 by Martha Burns, Ph.D
There’s a tug of war going on in American schools, a tension between learners’ developmental needs and the academic rigor required to meet challenging educational standards. In the classroom, where standardized assessments are the driving force of the day, the developmental realities of learners are often overlooked and shortchanged—and it’s something we ought to be talking about.

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