Assessing ELLs for Special Education: 5 Pitfalls to Avoid

Aug 19, 2014 by Hallie Smith, MA CCC-SLP

Assessing ELLs for special educationWhen educating English language learners who are struggling, how do you know when it’s time for a special education referral? How can you be sure you are assessing ELLs fairly, not mixing up linguistic and cultural diversity with cognitive ability and intellectual functioning?

Dyslexia – How Far We’ve Come!

Aug 5, 2014 by Martha Burns, Ph.D

DyslexiaWe’ve come a long way in understanding dyslexia since the term was first used more than 40 years ago. Find out what the latest research says about the dyslexic brain and learn about neuroscience-based interventions that are proven to help.

Debunking Anecdotes – One Parent’s Journey Through a Maze of Misconceptions About Learning Disabilities

Jul 22, 2014 by Joanne Gouaux

Debunking anecdotes about learning disabilities"If you read to them, they will read." That statement, along with a few other common misconceptions about learning disabilities, kept one parent from finding the help her son needed to achieve academic success.

Keep Learning This Summer - Four Must-Watch Webinars for Teachers

Jun 10, 2014 by Alexis Hourselt

School’s out for summer! While it’s a great time to relax and reset before the start of the next school year, it’s also a great time to catch up on professional development. This summer, check out some of Scientific Learning’s most popular webinars on brain science topics to help your students.

The iPad® and Student Engagement: Is There a Connection?

Apr 1, 2014 by Carrie Gajowski, MA

When students at ACS Cobham International School (UK) got iPads, Richard Harrold saw an opportunity. As a lower (elementary) school assistant principal at the school, he had been hearing glowing reports from other educators about students using iPads and seeing remarkable gains. Were the gains real? This is what he found out.

Self-Regulation Strategies for Students With Learning Disabilities

Mar 18, 2014 by Carrie Gajowski, MA

When a student with a learning disability struggles academically, it’s logical to think that the issue is related to the student’s deficit in a specific ability. And while that may be true, there might be more to it. Students with learning disabilities may not know how to effectively work through challenges. Here are 4 self-regulation strategies that can benefit your whole class.

Teach More Vocabulary, Faster, Using the Power of Morphology

Mar 4, 2014 by Norene Wiesen

You can teach your students 10 vocabulary words the usual way – one at a time – or you can teach them 100 vocabulary words with little extra effort. The second approach seems like the obvious choice, and in Dr. Tim Rasinski’s recent webinar, Comprehension – Going Beyond Fluency, he makes the case for greater adoption of the accelerated approach.

Four Myths About Learning Disabilities

Feb 18, 2014 by Hallie Smith, MA CCC-SLP

Learning differences or disabilities are frequently misunderstood. Symptoms of specific learning disabilities can be complex and confusing, and may look more like behavioral problems than learning problems to some. But some of the most common myths about learning disabilities are easy to dispel with a look at the facts.

Flipping the Classroom for Students With Learning Disabilities

Feb 11, 2014 by Norene Wiesen

For many teachers, the words “flipped classroom” are nothing more than a synonym for having students watch pre-recorded lesson videos at home and then do related assignments – formerly homework – during class time. There’s no doubt that that is exactly what the flipped classroom typically looks like on the surface. But when flip teaching is done right, what matters is that it uses time differently and more effectively, in ways that can profoundly benefit all learners, including students with learning disabilities.

Remediation vs. Accommodation: Helping Students with Learning Disabilities Succeed

Jan 28, 2014 by Norene Wiesen

Meeting the needs of students with learning disabilities can be a challenge. Students newly identified with a learning disability are likely to need immediate accommodation. But for maximum long-term benefit, educators need to address the learning difficulty at its core. How do we strike the right balance between remediation and accommodation?

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