5 Things You Might Not Know About English Language Learners

May 27, 2014 by Norene Wiesen

English Language Learners ELLs It’s no secret that the number of English Language Learners (ELLs) in the United States is booming. By 2025, nearly one out of every four public school students is expected to be an English learner. What do you know about this skyrocketing student population?

Top 10 Tips for Working With ELL Students

May 13, 2014 by Hallie Smith, MA CCC-SLP

How can you help your ELL students participate more fully in the classroom so they can achieve to the best of their ability? Try these 10 tips for supporting English learners in improving their language skills and subject knowledge.

Latin and Greek Morphemes Build Vocabulary

Apr 29, 2014 by Timothy Rasinski, Ph.D

Phonics teachers know that knowledge of word families can help students sound out many words such as tall, call, calling, west, crest, tallest, etc. It’s much the same with Latin and Greek morphemes, which not only provide clues to the pronunciation of words, but also help students determine the meaning of words.

Social Skills in the Digital Age: What’s Screen Time Got to Do With It?

Apr 15, 2014 by Norene Wiesen

Most of us who spend time with kids know that good social skills are a must for navigating life. But many children today are not developing the social skills they need to effectively handle interpersonal relationships. Is screen time getting in the way?

 

 

The iPad® and Student Engagement: Is There a Connection?

Apr 1, 2014 by Carrie Gajowski, MA

When students at ACS Cobham International School (UK) got iPads, Richard Harrold saw an opportunity. As a lower (elementary) school assistant principal at the school, he had been hearing glowing reports from other educators about students using iPads and seeing remarkable gains. Were the gains real? This is what he found out.

How to Tell When Neuroscience-Based Programs are Well-Developed

Mar 25, 2014 by Martha Burns, Ph.D

Many technology programs claim to improve brain function, including memory and attention skills. How can you get through all the hype and determine which brain exercises incorporate the important design features that have been shown to be effective?

 

 

Self-Regulation Strategies for Students With Learning Disabilities

Mar 18, 2014 by Carrie Gajowski, MA

When a student with a learning disability struggles academically, it’s logical to think that the issue is related to the student’s deficit in a specific ability. And while that may be true, there might be more to it. Students with learning disabilities may not know how to effectively work through challenges. Here are 4 self-regulation strategies that can benefit your whole class.

Smarten Up! Three Facts About the Learning Brain

Mar 11, 2014 by Carrie Gajowski, MA
It’s Brain Awareness Week! To celebrate, we’ve put together a few fun facts about the brain and how it learns. Share them and spread the word about why good nutrition, sleep, and learning habits matter.

Teach More Vocabulary, Faster, Using the Power of Morphology

Mar 4, 2014 by Norene Wiesen

You can teach your students 10 vocabulary words the usual way – one at a time – or you can teach them 100 vocabulary words with little extra effort. The second approach seems like the obvious choice, and in Dr. Tim Rasinski’s recent webinar, Comprehension – Going Beyond Fluency, he makes the case for greater adoption of the accelerated approach.

Summer Learning Programs, ELLs and the Achievement Gap

Feb 25, 2014 by Hallie Smith, MA CCC-SLP
Educators are faced with responsibility and pressure like never before, so it’s no wonder that summer learning loss doesn’t often get the attention it deserves. But if every district offered a quality summer learning program to disadvantaged learners, some of those pressures might begin to let up. Here’s why.

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