The Science of Learning Blog
Text Size A A A

Showing posts in February 2011  Show all posts >

Join Dr. Martha Burns and Sherrelle Walker for a Virtual Brain Fitness Seminar

Virtual brain fitness summit

Can’t attend one of our live Brain Fitness Seminars? Then join us for a Virtual Brain Fitness Seminar instead! These short, online sessions will review the new science of learning and how it can help schools close the achievement gap.

Register today for one of six exclusive upcoming sessions:

  • Monday, 2/28/11 – 2 sessions: 8am or 1pm (PT)
  • Wednesday, 3/9/11 – 2 sessions: 8am or 1pm (PT)
  • Wednesday, 4/27/11 – 2 sessions: 8am or 1pm (PT)

Within the past seven years, researchers have discovered why some children struggle to learn math and reading skills. In general, studies show that the brain architecture—the pre-wired pathways for processing information—that children need to succeed in school is weak or underdeveloped in struggling learners. Studies have also proven that this architecture can be quickly and efficiently developed and fortified through brain fitness exercises that supplement curriculum. 

Presenters for these exclusive Scientific Learning webinars will be Dr. Martha S. Burns, Director of the Clinical Specialist Market, and Sherrelle Walker, Chief Education Officer. Each session will include district results presented by long-time Scientific Learning customers, as well as a designated period for presenters to respond to your questions and answers. 

Our agenda for each session will be as follows:

  • 20 min. – Dr. Martha S. Burns, The New Science of Learning: Brain Fitness for all Ages
    What does the latest research tell us about how the brain learns? This session summarizes the latest neuroscience and developments from the field. Dr. Burns brings over 40 years of experience as a practicing speech and language pathologist. She has authored over 100 journal articles on the neuroscience of language and communication, as well as three books on language difficulties associated with neurological disorders. She is also the creator of the “Burns Brief Inventory of Communication and Cognition,” an evaluation of cognitive deficits resulting from neurological injury.
  • 30 min. – Sherrelle Walker, Changing Lives through Application of Research
    During this information-packed half-hour, Ms. Walker will discuss concrete, useful strategies for integrating Brain Fitness into district instructional plans, with the goal of accelerating learning and delivering results. Walker brings more than 30 years experience in public education to her work as Chief Education Officer of Scientific Learning. In this capacity, she strives to expand awareness among educators nationwide about how Scientific Learning’s products and services have been proven capable of significantly improving student learning and achievement.
  • 10 min. – Customer: District Results
  • 5 min. – All: Questions and Answers

Space is limited, so register today! We look forward to meeting you online.

Related Reading:

What Makes Superman So Great? Closing the Achievement Gap

5 Insights from our Recent Brain Fitness Webinars

Subscribe to this blog to get new blog posts right in your inbox and stay up to date on the science of learning!

  

Attend one of our popular webinars with thought leaders in learning. Live and pre-recorded webinars are available. Register today!

Connect with us on your favorite social network! RSS youtube linkedin

Categories: Brain Fitness, Education Trends, Reading & Learning, Scientific Learning Research

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Indispensible Automaticity: How Reading Frees the Mind to Learn

Automaticity in student reading

“The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.”

As a pangram, a sentence that uses every letter in the alphabet, this one is wonderfully concise, quick and easy to process. You probably read it and understood it all in less than a single second. You didn’t have to think about what the individual letters or sound out the syllables. You knew how the ideas fit together because of how well you have internalized the parts of speech. You were able to digest the text with what is known as automaticity.

Automaticity is that ability to do things without having to think about them at a conscious level. When we do something automatically, the mind isn’t occupied with the small details of the task. Imagine some of the common every day activities you do with automaticity: driving a car, adding five plus three, riding a bicycle, catching a ball, dialing a telephone, and, yes, reading and writing. We acquire these skills through simple repetition and practice. Over time, such repetition establishes automatic response patterns that our brains call upon constantly throughout our daily lives. In achieving automaticity, we free our brains – our working memories – from the details of the task, allowing us to use that brain power to do more, building on those sets of automatic skills.

For our students, achieving automaticity  in reading is essential not only to their becoming effective readers, but becoming effective all-around learners. The majority of students make the shift from “learning to read” to “reading to learn” around second or third grade. At this stage, their reading skills have developed to a point of automaticity where they no longer need to use their working memory to facilitate the task of reading, and they can use that memory for things like interpretation, comprehension and creative thinking.

On the other hand, imagine what learning becomes for the struggling student who does not develop this automaticity alongside his or her fellow students. As others begin to learn more and more from their reading, the struggling reader must engage their working memory in the challenge of getting through the letters and words of each sentence as opposed to using that valuable memory to glean meanings and assimilate information. As their reading skills lag, their overall ability to learn suffers.

We cannot underestimate the importance of building rock-solid foundations in reading and math for exactly this reason. If we are to successfully teach students, we must help them develop the automaticity in these basic skills that will free their minds to soar and explore all that lies ahead.

For more information and ideas to help students develop reading automaticity, read The Importance of Automaticity and Fluency For Efficient Reading Comprehension by Pamela E. Hook and Sandra D. Jones, from Perspectives, Winter, 2002, vol. 28, no. 1.

Related Reading:

Print Exposure, Reading Fluency, and Academic Success

Teaching Children to Read

Creating Reading Intention to Improve Reading Comprehension Skills in Students

Subscribe to this blog to get new blog posts right in your inbox and stay up to date on the science of learning!

  

Attend one of our popular webinars with thought leaders in learning. Live and pre-recorded webinars are available. Register today!

Connect with us on your favorite social network! RSS youtube linkedin

Categories: Brain Fitness, Education Trends, Reading & Learning

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Improving Reading Comprehension in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Autism Spectrum DisordersFinally! I am pleased that Emily Iland, the author of the recently released book, Drawing a Blank: Improving Reading Comprehension for Readers on the Autism Spectrum, has addressed the issue of hidden reading comprehension problems in some children on the autism spectrum. For more than 30 years I have been working with children with a diagnosis of hyperlexia. Occasionally also diagnosed with High Functioning Autism or Asperger's Syndrome, these are children who can read words-with ease- often without any reading instruction,  and sometimes at a very early age. These children, who invariably show problems in socialization skills, also may exhibit significant impairments in language and auditory processing, yet they have been able to miraculously “break the code.”

These children may perform well on early tests of reading readiness and decoding. The term Hyperlexia is applied because they are often sounding out words (decoding) better than their peers who have no developmental issues. Because of their decoding skills, these children may not be identified as needing any special support in reading through the IEP process. In reality, they need help with comprehension and vocabulary of the sentences they can read aloud so easily.  Like Emily IIand, I have delighted in seeing this incredible ability to decode words develop and have recognized the issue of the comprehension problems that are often hidden in these children on the Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Iland writes from the perspective of a mother turned researcher and educational therapist. Her son’s spontaneous abilities to read and spell as a toddler were regarded as an exceptional talent (later diagnosed as hyperlexia). Although his ability to decode words continued, by fourth grade he began to struggle academically due to undetected comprehension problems. At age 13, he was tested and found to have a 12-year gap between his reading comprehension skills (4th grade level) and mathematic skills (16th grade level). Eventually he was diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum.  But after intensive intervention, he was able to earn his bachelor’s degree in accounting, pass the CPA exam, and obtain employment as an accountant. However, many students like her son do not have this happy outcome because reading comprehension issues are not identified or properly remediated.

In her review of typical reading skill development, Iland points out where the breakdowns in comprehension begin for children with autism. She discusses the impact of the social deficits associated with autism spectrum disorders on comprehension of language and reading. The child’s narrow range of interests can lead to limited exposure to the world and restricted vocabulary. Difficulties with interpersonal relationships can interfere with the ability to learn that other people may have different perspectives, motivations and beliefs. Rigid thinking can restrict the children from understanding that words can have multiple meanings and that different words can be used to mean the same thing.

The reading comprehension problems of individuals with autism are often “masked,” or hidden, by their strengths in decoding, fluency, rote memory, and understanding of concrete information. This is especially true during the early school years when there is a focus on teaching children HOW to read. There are specific difficulties in young children that correlate with later difficulties in reading comprehension that should be closely examined in children with autism. For example, a child who is reading fluently may not have good phonemic awareness abilities due to  the auditory processing problems, which are common in children with ASD.  Receptive language problems may also be present in these children. Iland discusses appropriate assessment tools for different ages, as well as the importance of identifying the underlying comprehension difficulties of these children.

A significant part of the book focuses on reading comprehension strategies to improve skills for these children. Iland shares the implications of the limited research on effective remediation of reading comprehension for learners with ASD. She addresses the recommendations of the National Reading Panel, pointing out the best strategies for students with ASD and helping the reader recognize strategies that would likely be a mismatch. While Iland selects strategies because of their value for children with ASD, many of them are useful for other children as well. Drawing a Blank: Improving Reading Comprehension for Readers on the Autism Spectrum is a welcome and needed resource. Emily Iland’s multiple perspectives and clear writing style make this book user-friendly for parents, educators, speech-language pathologists, students and others interested in helping individuals who are on the autism spectrum become more successful readers.

Related Reading:

Creating Reading Intention: Strategies to Improve Reading Comprehension Skills in Students

Teaching and Learning with Intent through Guided Reading Activities

Related Webinars:

Autism: What is the Latest Research?

Autism: Support and Interventions

Subscribe to this blog to get new blog posts right in your inbox and stay up to date on the science of learning!

  

Attend one of our popular webinars with thought leaders in learning. Live and pre-recorded webinars are available. Register today!

Connect with us on your favorite social network! RSS youtube linkedin

Categories: Brain Research, Family Focus, Special Education

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Private Providers: Register Today for Scientific Learning’s 2011 Visionary Conference!

2011 Visionary Conference

Are you on a quest to develop the maximum potential of each client you serve? Do you strive to excel in your clinical implementations of the neuroscience based Fast ForWord® and Reading Assistant™ software? Are you eager to learn more effective ways to market your business and brand your unique way of providing clinical expertise, or to hear the latest outcomes on independent neuroscience research?

Then the 2011 Visionary Conference is all about you! Plan now to join us for the 2011 Visionary Conference, March 24-26, taking place again this year in San Diego. Scientific Learning's founders will present new research and strategies highlighting the effective use of the company’s proven products. Additional topics will be covered during this engaging two-day conference, plus, there will be time for discussion and opportunities to network with your peers.

Choose how you want to participate – join us in person or online! While the live event will take place in San Diego, if travel doesn’t fit into your plans, we invite you to participate via WebEx.

Whatever you choose – live or virtual – registration for this event is free, but all attendees must register in advance to reserve a space.

And if you join us in San Diego, Scientific Learning is covering all of your conference costs, materials, supplies and meals – all you need to do is provide your own travel and accommodations.  

The deadline of March 14, 2011 is coming fast, so register today for the 2011 Visionary Conference.

Related Reading:

Teaching and Learning with Intent through Guided Reading Activities

Subscribe to this blog to get new blog posts right in your inbox and stay up to date on the science of learning!

  

Attend one of our popular webinars with thought leaders in learning. Live and pre-recorded webinars are available. Register today!

Connect with us on your favorite social network! RSS youtube linkedin

Categories: Fast ForWord, Reading Assistant, Scientific Learning Research

Tags: , ,

Test Scores Exceed State Average in 4 Subject Areas After Fast ForWord

St. Mary Parish began using Fast ForWord products in the 2006-2007 school year with eight elementary schools.  Over the next few years they continually expanded until they had a full district implementation by 2009-2010.  Overall, Fast ForWord and Reading Assistant products were used by almost 6,000 St. Mary Parish students by 2010.

This study investigates the changes during that time to the district’s performance on the Louisiana Educational Assessment Program, or LEAP for short.  This test is given to 4th and 8th grade students.  The following analyses consider four main subtests: English/Language Arts, Math, Social Studies, and Science.

After implementing Fast ForWord products, the St. Mary 4th grade passing rate for ELA converged upon, and then exceeded the state average.  After Fast ForWord was introduced, the percentage of the district’s students passing the LEAP Math test increased dramatically.  The 4th grade Science test exhibits the same trend as does the 4th grade Social Studies test.

The gap in passing rates between black and white students has also been reduced for both the elementary English and elementary Math LEAP tests.  There has also been a longitudinal increase in the percentage of 4th graders meeting the overall promotion standard since Fast ForWord products were introduced - from 65% in 2006 to 85% in 2010. 

Following Fast ForWord implementation, district LEAP performance approached and then exceeded the state average in all four subjects.  The performance gap between black and white students closed significantly.  And finally, the 4th grade promotion rates steadily increased.

For more information, please see the Educator Briefing on this study as well as any of our 200+ additional reports on Fast ForWord software results. If you have questions about any of our research studies, please contact us.

Related Reading:

Can Scientific Learning Products Improve School Test Scores?

Over 45% Relative Improvement in Students Reaching Proficiency

Dr. Donald Aguillard: Improving Louisiana Educational Assessment Program (LEAP) Scores in St. Mary Parish Schools

 

Subscribe to this blog to get new blog posts right in your inbox and stay up to date on the science of learning!

  

Attend one of our popular webinars with thought leaders in learning. Live and pre-recorded webinars are available. Register today!

Connect with us on your favorite social network! RSS youtube linkedin

Categories: Brain Fitness, Brain Research, Fast ForWord, Reading & Learning, Reading Assistant, Scientific Learning Research

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Why Your Brain Loves Chocolate

Love and chocolate

As mid-February rolls around, two subjects, hand in hand, start winding their way into our societal consciousness. Like it or not, you probably have two items “on the brain” these days: love and chocolate.

Now, I sincerely hope you have an affinity for love. Likewise, probability indicates that you most likely have an affinity for chocolate. But what is it about chocolate that has all of us running to the store on Valentine’s Day to procure those shiny red boxes for our loved ones?

Consider the sensations that love creates in the brain. When we are in love, what do we feel? What are the elemental feelings and emotions that a true, heart-felt loving relationship create?  Think about the sensations associated with a budding romantic bond; being with that other person creates feelings of well-being and centeredness. We feel stimulated and awake in their presence, aware of their every word and move. We feel pleasure just being in the same room with them.

Now, consider chocolate. As it turns out, there are an extensive number of compounds in chocolate – about 380 – a number of which can have profound effects on our brain chemistry and contribute to these same feelings and sensations that accompany courtship and love.

Imagine that you have just received that delightful box from your loved one. You lift off the flimsy, red cardboard top, slip off that sheet of paper, and within you find a dozen small brown paper cups, each gently holding one of these delicious trifles. You pick the darkest one in the box and pop it in your mouth. Then what happens?

As you chew, savor and swallow, your body begins to digest and metabolize those 300+ compounds. Here are a few of them and their affects:

  • Tryptophan and serotonin: They create feelings of relaxation and well-being.
  • Caffeine: This psychoactive substance creates temporary alertness.
  • Xanthines: This mild stimulant occurs naturally in the brain and, like caffeine, increases wakefulness.
  • Theobromine: This stimulant and vasodilator increases blood flow.
  • Phenylethylamine: This compound stimulates the brain to release dopamine, a neurotransmitter associated with feelings of pleasure and motivation.
  • Anandamide: This neurotransmitter activates pleasure receptors in the brain.
  • Flavonols: Found also in foods like red wine, blueberries and green tea, these compounds boost blood flow to key areas of the brain for two to three hours after being metabolized, creating effects similar to those of a mild analgesic (painkiller) like aspirin.[i]

While a great number of researchers continue to unravel the details of how the compounds in chocolate affect brain chemistry, in reading this list, the simple question that comes to my mind is this:

If you were in a courtship situation, wouldn’t you take actions to engender these same sensations in your prospective mate? If in having the object of your desires consume a cocoa-based gift you can create associations within their mind connecting you with feelings of stimulation, pleasure, wakefulness, relaxation, well-being and even relief of pain, doesn’t that bode well for the development of love?

To be accurate, many of these compounds must be metabolized in large quantities to create noticeable effects. For example, Christian Felder of the National Institute of Mental Health estimates that a 130-pound person would have to eat 25 pounds of chocolate at one time to experience an intoxicating effect.[ii] (Please, no matter how tempted you might be, don’t try this at home.)

Of course, in the end, we cannot ignore the simple sensations of eating chocolate that make it such a widely-loved experience. Researcher Daniele Piomelli, in his studies of chocolate, speculates that the ingredients, smells, tastes and textures of chocolate alone can be enough to induce feelings of pleasure.[iii]

So with those thoughts in your brain, make it a wonderful Valentine’s Day.

For additional reading, check out Brain Cannabinoids in Chocolate(published in Nature, August 22, 1996), Prescription-based Chocolate by Jon Marino (2004), and Why Women Need Chocolate by Debra Waterhouse (1995).

[i] ”Boosting Brain Power – With Chocolate,” Science Daily (2007, February 22).

[ii]Ellen Kuwana, “Discovering the Sweet Mysteries of Chocolate,” Neuroscience for Kids (2010, October 1).

[iii]Ciampa, Linda. “Researchers say chocolate triggers feel-good chemicals,” CNN (1996).

My Favorite Chocolate:

TCHO

Related Reading:

Food and the Brain

Educating Kids about Nutrition and the Brain

Subscribe to this blog to get new blog posts right in your inbox and stay up to date on the science of learning!

  

Attend one of our popular webinars with thought leaders in learning. Live and pre-recorded webinars are available. Register today!

Connect with us on your favorite social network! RSS youtube linkedin

Categories: Brain Research

Tags: ,

6 Ways to Empower Your Students as Contributors in the Classroom

Students helping students

If you attended our Fall Brain Fitness Webinar by Alan November, Creating a New Culture of Teaching and Learning, you know what an inspiring thinker and speaker he is.  It should come as no surprise, then, that he’s an inspiring writer as well. 

I recently discovered an article on his website outlining 6 ways to engage students as contributors in the classroom as a way of supporting their natural drive to participate in an active and meaningful way.  Here are the first 3:

    1. Engage students as tutorial designers to create supportive content for each other
    2. Assign official student scribes to take collaborative class notes
    3. Designate a student researcher to find the answers to classroom questions

This partial list is just the tip of the iceberg.  Be sure to read the full article, Students as Contributors: The Digital Learning Farm, on the November Learning website to discover 3 more ways that educators are empowering their students in the classroom right now, and find out what tools are available to bring these ideas into your own classroom or school.

Be sure to join us for our Spring Brain Fitness Webinar Series featuring Alan November (April 12) and Bill Daggett (March 18), thought-leaders in education that you don’t want to miss.  Subscribe to this blog to receive all the details about upcoming webinars in your inbox!

Related Reading:

How to Motivate Students: The Psychology of Success 

Using the Human Element to Make Science Fun and Approachable

Subscribe to this blog to get new blog posts right in your inbox and stay up to date on the science of learning!

  

Attend one of our popular webinars with thought leaders in learning. Live and pre-recorded webinars are available. Register today!

Connect with us on your favorite social network! RSS youtube linkedin

Categories: Brain Fitness, Education Trends, Reading & Learning

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Adult and Family literacy in the US; limitations to our Nation’s success

improving literacy

“Some people there are who, being grown; forget the horrible task of learning to read. It is perhaps the greatest single effort that the human undertakes, and he must do it as a child.” –John Steinbeck

But what about those who fail to become literate through traditional schooling?  Low literacy continues to be a persistent problem among adults in the United States.  Results from the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL), available through the National Center for Education Statistics, found that 30 million adults have “below basic” literacy skills, with more than half of those scoring at this level not having a high school diploma or GED.  This translates to nearly 1 out of every 6 adults, age 25 and older, across the country.  This crisis has resulted in the following:  (findings from the Report of the National Commission on Adult Literacy)

  • U.S. Scores Poorly Internationally. The U.S. is the only country among 30 OECD free-market countries where the current generation is less well educated than the previous one.
  • High School Dropout Rates Are Staggering. Every year, one in three young adults—more than 1.2 million people—drop out of high school.
  • Low Parent Learning Affects Children. One in four U.S. working families is low-income, and one in five children lives in poverty. Parents and caregivers in many of these households lack the education and skills to earn a family-sustaining wage.
  • Low Literacy in Burgeoning Prison Population. One in every 100 U.S. adults 16 and older is in prison or jail in America.  About 43 percent do not have a high school diploma or equivalent, and 56 percent have very low literacy skills.
  • Large and Growing English Language and Literacy Need. About 2 million immigrants come to the U.S. each year seeking jobs and better lives—the promise of America. About 50 percent of them have low literacy levels and lack high school education and English language skills, severely limiting their access to jobs and job training, college, and citizenship.

Yet despite the challenges, there is an incentive to overcome these obstructions.  A better educated more literate population will improve our standard of living and offer benefits in the following ways:

  • Higher rates of employment and better jobs
  • Increases in personal income and individual economic well being
  • Increases in voter participation, volunteerism and civic engagement
  • Better health and more effective healthcare
  • A greater fiscal contribution to our economy at all government levels

And at the very heart of this is you, an influential role model and innovator whose evidence-based approach to education will boost our country back into a position of global leadership; because effective education is the best investment we can make!

Related Reading:

The 30 Million Word Gap in Language Experience Puts Kids At Risk

HABLA Program Helps Disadvantaged Early Learners Lay Foundations for Success

Subscribe to this blog to get new blog posts right in your inbox and stay up to date on the science of learning!

  

Attend one of our popular webinars with thought leaders in learning. Live and pre-recorded webinars are available. Register today!

Connect with us on your favorite social network! RSS youtube linkedin

Categories: Education Trends, Family Focus

Tags: , , , , , ,

How Much Sleep Do Children Need?

Children's Sleep

Sleep is essential to health and well-being as well as performance in work and play. Sleep and wake cycles appear to be regulated by the brain. And, although sleep allows for renewal of organs of body, it is also vital to cognitive skills in children and adults. Just a small amount of sleep deprivation affects performance for days thereafter.

There are two kinds of sleep that adults and children cycle through during the night, non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) which accounts for about 80% of sleep and occurs more frequently during the first half of the night and rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) that accounts for the other 20% as is more prevalent during the second half of the night.. Rapid eye movement occurs when we dream as our eyes dart back and forth under our closed eyelids. Despite this complex nature of sleep performance during the day is dependent on the total number of hours of sleep.[i]

Children need much more sleep than adults and it is important that they have schedules and an environment that conducive to adequate sleep. There is a great deal of scientific evidence regarding the importance of sleep to the developing brain yet our nations’ children are not getting enough.

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) conducted a Poll in 2004 to determine the amount of sleep our nations’ children are receiving and factors that are affecting the quantity and quality of sleep our children receive.[ii]  In general they found that our nations’ children from birth through adolescence are sleep deprived: infants are getting one to two hours per day less sleep than experts recommend and toddlers through school aged children average from one half hour to two hours less per day.

Expert recommendations are provided below with U.S. averages in parentheses.

  • 14-15 hours sleep per day for children aged 3-11 months  ( U.S. infants average is 12.7)
  • 12-14 hours of sleep a day for children aged 1-3 years (U.S. toddlers average 11.7)
  • 11-13 hours per day for children aged 3-5 children  (U.S. preschoolers average 10.4) 
  • 10-11 hours for 1st through 5th grades children (U.S. children average 9.5)  

Children who do not get adequate sleep are more likely to develop problems getting to sleep and staying asleep at night. But most important, when children do not get adequate sleep experts report that, unlike adults who act lethargic during the day, children exhibit hyperactivity.

Two problems that experts say decrease the amount of sleep children get are consumption of caffeine during the day and having a television in the bedroom. The poll conducted by the National Sleep Foundation found that 43% of school-aged children, 30% of preschoolers and 18-20% of infants and toddlers have televisions in their rooms.

Another reason some children have trouble staying asleep is sleep apnea (brief stoppage of airflow at night that causes a child to awake). Doctors and parents may not suspect sleep is being affected by snoring because children do not exhibit the same behaviors as adults when they get insufficient sleep. Unlike adults suffering from sleep apnea who complain of fatigue and sleepiness, children may exhibit hyperactivity and aggressive behavior. So parents should tell their pediatricians if their child snores or wakes frequently during the night but also check for sleep deprivation when their child is showing increased activity or aggressive behavior that seems out of character for the child.

Related Reading:

The Imperative of Cultivating Healthy Adolescent Sleep Habits

Sleep: An Essential Ingredient for Memory Function

[i] Kruger, J.M., Rector, D.M., Roy, S., Van Dongen, H.P.A., Belenky, G. and Panksepp, J. (2008) Sleep as a fundamental property of neuronal assemblies. Nature Reveiws Neuroscience. 9, 12, 910-919

[ii] The National Sleep Foundation website contains a paper which summarizes the 2004 poll.www.sleepfoundation.org.

Subscribe to this blog to get new blog posts right in your inbox and stay up to date on the science of learning!

  

Attend one of our popular webinars with thought leaders in learning. Live and pre-recorded webinars are available. Register today!

Connect with us on your favorite social network! RSS youtube linkedin

Categories: Family Focus

Tags: , , ,

Choose a product to log in.

Not a customer? Find Out More

Log in to MySciLEARN

What is MySciLEARN?

  • One destination for products, training, reports and tools
  • Auto-assign tool
  • Implementation Success and Gains reports
  • SciLEARNU training portal
  • Expanded roles capability

Learn More

Choose a product to log in.

Not a student? Find Out More