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Showing posts in April 2011  Show all posts >

Sensory-Motor Development and Learning in Children

Sensory-motor development

Spring is always a busy time of year for our private providers who are ramping up to serve Scientific Learning adaptive learning software to more children and their families over the summer months.  So, we like to bring our private providers together with some of our most inspiring speakers at the annual Visionary Conference for a weekend full of engaged learning. 

This year's Visionary Conference was so jam packed with great content, I've been chomping at the bit to share some of it with the rest of you.  One presentation that received rave feedback was by Cheryl Chia of BrainFit Studio, one of our international VARs from Singapore. She presented on sensory-motor development and learning in children. BrainFit Studio is located in Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore and Indonesia.

Cheryl’s team has developed programs for children to improve sensory-motor abilities and have a positive impact on their learning abilities and academic performance. She focuses on three aspects of brain fitness. The first two, Sensory-Motor and Visual Brain Fitness, she calls the “pillars” of her intervention: SMART Moves and SMART Vision. SMARTMoves, the Sensory-Motor pillar emphasizes proprioception ( the automatic awareness of the positions of our arms and legs), tactile sensation, and the vestibular system (balance and posture). SMART vision, the Visual Brain Fitness pillar, includes visual spatial perception, and visual memory—skills that are essential for handwriting and courses with spatial concepts, like geometry. Visual ability is also important for team sports and social skills. 

The third pillar is Computer-Assisted Brain Fitness Training that includes the Fast ForWord® family of products.

Cheryl shared her assessment protocol, a “cognitive map” prepared for each child that focuses on the three pillars. The cognitive map is used for determining which pillars to emphasize for each child.

View the full presentation to see video of the types of activities the children participate in under each BrainFit pillar and the outcome data. 

I hope you find it as compelling as I did!

Related Reading:

How Learning to Read Improves Brain Function

Let's Get Engaged!

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Categories: Brain Fitness, Education Trends, Fast ForWord

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Engaging Children in the World with Words

Engaging children

As we all know, the rudimentary elements of language are established at the earliest ages. From a baby’s first months, they instinctively begin listening and forming the neurological groundwork for what will become their abilities to understand language, as well as speak and read.

While there are numerous studies around the topic, I’d like to take you through a simple series of imaginary scenarios to demonstrate the importance of this point—for children as well as for those of us in charge of their learning.

First, imagine the world from the baby’s point of view. They observe, see the shapes and colors around them, and as they do, they hear the voices of their parents, and they begin associating certain sounds with the surrounding world. Now, imagine how the understanding of that process—as a teaching tool in the hands of a conscientious parent—can shape that child’s abilities from the earliest of ages.

Scenario 1: A parent—let’s call her Jane—is walking down the street, slowly because she is holding her young toddler’s hand. Suddenly, a loud siren screams and around the corner comes a gleaming fire engine. Jane quickly points to it, looks into her child’s concerned eyes, smiles and says, "Loud!" As the fire engine goes by, it splashes through a great puddle in the road, spraying the two with water. Jane says, smiling and laughing, "Ohhh, no! Wet! We got wet!" Jane’s child begins to smile and laugh, too.

Scenario 2: Another parent, Carol, has her child in a stroller and is walking at a brisk clip. She is conducting business with the cell phone in one hand and is pushing the stroller with the other. They are enjoying the sunshine, and the child is calmly, quietly watching the world go by. Suddenly, a loud siren screams and around the corner comes a gleaming fire engine. Carol says, "Oh, darn it. Can you hold on a sec?" into her phone. Her child, startled by the loud noise, begins to sob, but Carol doesn’t know it because she’s watching the fire engine pass and can’t hear her child because of the siren. As the fire engine goes by, it splashes through a great puddle in the road, spraying the two with water. Carol, with fury and frustration in her voice, says, "DARN IT! Can I call you back later? I just got soaked." By this time, Carol is genuinely angry and her child is wholeheartedly crying.

In these brief images, with so much playing out in terms of outward attitudes and reactions to circumstances, and we can even look ahead to possible bonding issues. But let’s think specifically about language. What has the child—as well as the parent—in scenario one gained and the child in scenario two lost?

While Carol’s child has witnessed frustration and fear in the face of incoming stimulus, Jane’s child has experienced the world through a comforting, loving, happy interpretive filter. In short, we cannot underestimate the importance of simply being engaged with the children in our lives. As teachers, encouraging the parents we encounter to be as connected and involved in their children’s lives as early as possible.

Related Reading:

The Speech and Language Connection: The Nursery Rhyme Effect (Part 1)

Let’s Get Engaged!

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Categories: Brain Fitness, Family Focus, Reading & Learning

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Let's Get Engaged!

ESL reading activities

The pressure on educators in today’s environment is nothing short of brutal. Achieving a balance between individualizing instruction and ensuring that all students are performing against standards requires comprehensive expertise, the ability to adapt to immediate needs of students and classrooms, and saintly patience.

This balancing act is especially challenging for educators in ESL classrooms. They not only have to deal with the same variations in skills, knowledge and experience that every classroom teacher must face; they must also engage students of varying cultural and linguistic backgrounds, making for an especially challenging mix of communications and social skills.

So, what kinds of reading activities can we use to teach all of these different students and engage them for maximum effectiveness? There is certainly no shortage of great techniques and ideas out there that we can mine. We need only to look to resources like The Internet TESL Journal, Dave’s ESL Café, ManyThings.org, and the US State Department’s English Teaching Forum for great techniques as well as background research.

Here are just a few seed questions to help you think about designing engaging ESL reading activities:

What’s your sign? The world we live in is awash with language in the form of signs and advertisements. Looking at signage out in the world around us not only offers wonderful, relevant reading material, it gives students short, quick messages to read and interpret. ManyThings.org offers an archive of over 700 photographs of signs to pull from at http://www.manythings.org/signs/.

What’s your story? Reading stories along with audio recordings is an excellent way to solidify reading and comprehension skills. We can maximize student engagement by choosing stories that are directly relevant to the cultural backgrounds of our students.  Not only will this engage individual students, but it will provide fodder for cross-cultural conversation and understanding. Further, in highlighting individual students’ cultures, it allows each to shine and find pride in their background. For stories, check out Folk Tales from Around the World and the World of Tales.

What’s cool? Maybe the most effective way to engage students in reading is to select activities that are of genuine interest to them as individuals. What are the things that they think are, well, cool? Where are their passions? Designing activities that plug into those interests has incredible potential for maximum effectiveness. Websites like How Stuff Works offer endless resources for allowing students to read and learn about the topics that they find most interesting. And when they’re genuinely interested, they are most likely to want to read more, discuss more and write more.

Finding the “sweet spot” for designing ESL reading activities requires a great arsenal of tactics, tools and techniques. But if we can create and execute activities that teach the essential skills through harnessing each student’s passions and interests, we are that much more likely to help them learn successfully.

Related Reading:

Indispensible Automaticity: How Reading Frees the Mind to Learn

How Learning to Read Improves Brain Function

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Categories: English Language Learners, Reading & Learning

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Students Exceed State Average on TAKS after Fast ForWord, Maintain Gains

Since the 2004-2005 school year, the Dallas Independent School District has used the Fast ForWord products in many of their high schools. This multi-year study followed more than 500 high school students from 20 schools over the years of their Fast ForWord participation.   This study shows impressive longitudinal results on the TAKS which is The Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills which is administered annually throughout Texas and is closely aligned with the state curricular standards.   A longitudinal study is a type of study that follows the same subjects over time.

Students started with the Fast ForWord Middle & High School product, now known as the Fast ForWord Literacy product. Many went on to use the Fast ForWord Language to Reading and Fast ForWord to Reading products. On average, students spent 60 days using the products during a 5 ½ month period.

 The scores of Fast ForWord participants moved in step with the state average until the students started to use Fast ForWord products.  During the year of Fast ForWord product use, the participants experienced accelerated learning that separated their performance from that of their peers.  Even up to two years after they finished using the products, the Fast ForWord participants maintained their improvements. The TAKS gains made during the study were statistically larger for the Dallas Fast ForWord participants than the gains made by their statewide peers.

Related Reading:

Why Time Matters in Learning

After Just 24 Days, Summer School Students Significantly Improve Reading Scores

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Categories: Education Trends, Reading & Learning, Scientific Learning Research

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Understanding Autism in Children

Autistic spectrum

Ever since we began to understand the autistic spectrum, researchers and laypeople alike have been fascinated by the mysteries of the disorder. The fact that high-functioning individuals with Asperger’s syndrome like Dr. Temple Grandin and Daniel Tammet have become public figures speaks to our fascination with what people on the autistic spectrum can achieve outwardly, as well as our desire to empathize with what they struggle with internally.

According to the CDC, approximately 9 in 1,000 children in the United States are diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum each year.[i] They are characterized as having “deficits in social reciprocity and communication, as well as by repetitive behaviors and restricted interests.”[ii] That said, how can we as educators better help them to not only become integrated into our classrooms, but more importantly, help them reap as much benefit as possible from the experiences we provide? What foundational information can we use to start constructing successful strategies for these children?

First, we can try to better understand the nature of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Recent studies have demonstrated linkages between ASD and auditory processing. Researchers at Vanderbilt University found that while typically developing (TD) children performed on par with ASD children on certain visually-oriented tasks, ASD children experienced greater challenges with auditory tasks.[iii] Likewise, researchers in Haifa, Israel showed that certain abnormal speech patterns directly correlated to ASD, further reinforcing the conclusion that auditory processes in the brain are implicated in those on the autism spectrum.[iv]

Understanding these linkages will not only help us better understand the ASD child’s experience, but it will help researchers and educators develop more effective learning strategies to help them achieve success.

At Scientific Learning, researchers performed a study in 2007 to evaluate how ASD children could benefit from Fast ForWord®, a program that engages and improves reading based on visual as well as auditory input.  We were happy to find that developmentally delayed children—specifically those with ASD—“made significant gains in their language ability.” The data suggest that Fast ForWord helped strengthen the foundational skills needed to help these students get more out of their classroom experiences, as well as function better in society.[v]

Nicole Russo led another study of ASD children related to auditory processing. In short she had two groups of ASD children, one who received Fast ForWord training, and a control who did not. Their data showed that the group who received Fast ForWord training showed changes in brainstem response timing, pitch-tracking, and cortical response timing, indicating that the technology may indeed prove to be a useful tool in the future for helping ASD children improve their processing capabilities.[vi]

Overall, our greatest hope for these students is to achieve a better understanding of two pieces of the autism puzzle: the neurology of the disorder, as well as the psychology and emotional struggles that these students deal with every day. I have found that along with reading the research cited above, I have also gained great insights by reading more personal accounts penned by those with ASD. It is in some of those personal writings that I find my greatest inspiration as these individuals work so hard—often with great success—to make themselves understood.

To increase your understanding of ASD, here are a couple of additional readings:

  • A new documentary, “Wretches and Jabberers,” directed by Academy Award-winning director Gerardine Wurzburg, recounts the experience of two autistic men and opens our eyes to better understand their world. Here is a recent review.
  • Raun K. Kaufman writes his own account of growing up with autism. While he was diagnosed at 18 months, his parents decided to break with traditional treatments and develop their own program for him. Kaufman describes himself as “fully recovered” from autism, and is today the Director of Global Outreach for the Autism Treatment Center of America. Read more about Kaufman and the child-centered Son-Rise Program.

Related Reading:

Improving Reading Comprehension in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Musical Training and Cognitive Abilities

[i] Newschaffer CJ, Croen LA, Daniels J et al. The epidemiology of autism spectrum disorders [PDF]. Annu Rev Public Health. 2007;28:235–58. doi:10.1146/annurev.publhealth.28.021406.144007. PMID 17367287.
[ii] Kwakye L, Foss-Feig J, Cascio C, Stone W, Wallace M. Altered auditory and multisensory temporal processing in autism spectrum disorders. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. Jan 5, 2011, 4:129. p 1.
[iii] Ibid.
[iv] Bonneh Y, Levanon  Y, Dean-Pardo  O, Lossos L, and Adini Y. Abnormal speech spectrum and increased pitch variability in young autistic children. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, Jan 19, 2011, 4:237, p 1.
[v] Scientific Learning Corporation. (2007). Improved Language Skills by Students with Developmental Delays who used Fast ForWord® Products, MAPS for Learning: Educator Reports, 11(12): 1-5.
[vi] Russo, M. Hornickel, J. Nicol, T. Zecker, S. Kraus, N. Biological changes in auditory function following training in children with autism spectrum disorders. Behavioral and Brain Functions. 2010, 6:60.


 

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Categories: Family Focus, Fast ForWord, Special Education

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“I Thought We Were Losing Him”: Why We Become Teachers

Reading level

A few months ago, we heard from Cory Armes, an Education Consultant at Scientific Learning, and she told her story about her experience with the Scientific Learning products and how that led her to become part of the Scientific Learning team.  Today we hear from Karen Forester, a Senior Implementation Manager in the South, about the impact of the Fast ForWord products on the life on one 13-year-old from Florida:

“Several years ago, while visiting a Fast ForWord lab at a middle school in Florida, I was working with the reading coach and teacher on data interpretation methods and real time results from the work their students had been doing in the exercises.  We were looking specifically at reading level gains and national percentile scores when I noticed one student had a four year, two month gain in only 60 days.  I pointed this out and the reading coach audibly gasped, then whispered, 'Can we look closer at his scores?' 

As we reviewed the detail report, we saw the remarkable progress this particular 13-year-old had made.  The reading coach started to say something, but her voice broke and she looked quickly away.  After a few moments, she told me how worried she had been about this student and that nothing she or his teachers had tried ever seemed to make a difference.  'Last year, he started acting out and his bad behavior landed him in the principal’s office many times; I thought we were losing him.'  Abruptly, she called the student’s name and asked him to come up to her desk.  He approached with great dread and a downcast look, but as soon as he reached her, she said, 'I am so proud of you, just look at what you’ve accomplished!' 

He looked startled and didn’t seem to understand what she just said.  When she saw his quizzical gaze, she pointed to the computer and asked him to see for himself what she meant.  He leaned in to peer at the screen and she began explaining his graphs, charts and scores.  She showed him how much his reading level had improved since he began working on Fast ForWord and praised his determination for sticking with the work and not giving up.  I asked him if he had noticed any difference.  Shyly, he said, 'Well, I like to read now and I didn’t before plus I haven’t got in trouble this year.'

With tears in her eyes, his teacher couldn’t resist placing her arm around his shoulders and announcing his success to the whole class.  I could tell the student was unaccustomed to such academic praise, but it didn’t take him long to flash a brilliant smile and I could see his whole body relax into the joy of the moment.  Both teacher and student were thrilled.

At the time, I remember thinking how that brief recognition could very well change the trajectory of this student’s life – from one with little possibility to one with infinite possibilities.  Where once there was misunderstanding, frustration and anger with learning, now there was comprehension, clarity and pride. 

And isn’t that why we become teachers?" 

Related Reading:

Our Lives Change, Too: From Fast ForWord® Skeptic to Believer

Indispensible Automaticity: How Reading Frees the Mind to Learn

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Categories: Fast ForWord, Reading & Learning

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48% More Students Newly Proficient on GA CRCT After Fast ForWord Use

Every spring, the Criterion-Referenced Competency Tests, abbreviated CRCT, are administered to students in Georgia.  The CRCT is designed to measure how well students acquire the skills and knowledge described in the Georgia Performance Standards. Students are tested in Reading, English Language Arts and Mathematics.  It is given every spring to all students in grades 1-8 and the students included in this study were first through eighth graders.

Students who used the Fast ForWord products generally started with the Fast ForWord Language or Fast ForWord Literacy products. During the 2007 – 2008 school year, some students started on the Fast ForWord Reading products, progressing as far as the Fast ForWord Reading Level 3 product.  On average, students used the products for 60 – 70 days during a 6 month period.

The first wave of Fast ForWord participants at Clarke County started using the products between the 2006 and 2007 tests and made statistically significant improvements on the spring 2007 CRCT with continued improvements in 2008.  Students in the second wave started using the products between the 2007 and 2008 tests and made statistically significant improvements on the spring 2008 CRCT.  The third group served as the comparison group and did not use the products until after the 2008 test. The students who used the Fast ForWord products made more improvements in their reading achievement, crossing the proficiency threshold, compared to the students who did not use the products. In fact, 40% of the participants who were not proficient in 2006 reached proficiency in 2007 compared to 27% of the non-proficient students who did not use products.

In addition to longitudinal results, data were also analyzed for certain demographic groups, including students who were receiving Special Education services and students with Limited English Proficiency. Both groups achieved statistically significant improvements on the CRCT Reading Test after Fast ForWord participation. Students who were receiving Special Education services and who used Fast ForWord products made significant gains in their reading scores, but more importantly, these gains were significantly greater than the gains made by the comparison group.  Similarly, students with limited English proficiency who used Fast ForWord products also made significant gains in their reading scores that were significantly greater than the gains made by the comparison group.

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Categories: Brain Fitness, English Language Learners, Fast ForWord, Reading & Learning, Scientific Learning Research

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Antidotes to Summer Brain Drain (Part 1): Tips and Tools for Fun Math Skills Practice

Blended learning

Every year, educators work hard to help their students learn as much as possible, squeezing in all the high-value knowledge they can. But come summer vacation, a solid percentage of that learning is lost as students walk away from school and get anywhere from six to twelve weeks to forget about the pressures of school and just go and be kids.

So, what can we do to minimize summer brain drain while still giving kids the break they need?

Since most kids backslide in math more than they do in reading (2.6 months of grade level equivalency, on average[i]), many parents welcome ideas for keeping math skills afloat without drowning the summer spirit.  Fortunately, with a little creativity, fun opportunities to practice math skills abound.

Look for ways to incorporate math into everyday activities.  Let your child pay with cash at the store.  Or have your child figure out the tip at a restaurant – without a calculator. Include your child in figuring out how much fabric you need to make curtains.  Bake together—and double the recipe, or halve it, letting your child figure out what the new measurements are for each ingredient.

If your child enjoys reading, add some math books to her summer reading list.  Your middle or high school student might enjoy the classic Flatland, a story that takes place entirely in two physical dimensions.  If you have an advanced math learner on your hands, she might be willing to give The Manga Guide to Calculus a try.  (There are additional Manga titles on Physics, Statistics, Molecular Biology, and other advanced subjects.)  Learners in middle school or the upper elementary grades may be interested in Math Curse. Math Fables is good for very young children (K – 1), while The Grapes of Math is more appropriate for ages 6 – 10 and Math Potatoes for grades 3-6.

For the child who loves computer games, Math Playground is a web site with free multimedia math games for elementary through middle school students.  The games on Math Playground are not indexed by grade level and the site features a lot of advertising, but the games are free & reasonably entertaining. In MathHoops, kids can solve word problems for a chance to shoot some hoops (this game does specify grades 3 - 5).  There’s a “need help” button for tips on how to translate the word problem into math steps (e.g., “key words like ‘more’ tell you to add”).

The X Detectives lets kids play secret agent, driving around a training compound in the “X-mobile” to work on skills in four different locations, such as negative numbers in the Integer Room and algebra puzzles in the Gadget Shop.  Party Designer requires kids to use algebraic reasoning to design a party floor plan. 

As Thomas Haller and Chick Moorman note in their article Summer Brain Drain: Tips to Help Your Child Avoid Summer Brain Drain, the key is balancing learning with fun.  They suggest a multitude of ways to practice academic skills while enjoying summer recreational activities.  Be sure to check out the article for ideas about how to incorporate math while playing in the pool, taking a road trip, playing card games, and collecting money for charity.  Perhaps the best advice is to model learning for your child by turning off the TV or video games and picking up a book or taking an art class.  Even if your kids don’t avoid the summer brain drain – you will!

If you enjoyed this post on avoiding the Summer Brain Drain, be sure to sign up to receive future posts in your inbox and be sure to catch Part 2 later this month!

Related Reading:

Fun Science Experiments for Classroom or Home

Fit Bodies Make Fit Brains: Physical Exercise and Brain Cells
 

[i] Strauss, Valerie. Active Summer, Active Minds: Educators Seek Ways to Prevent Learning Losses During Vacation. Monday, June 15, 2009.

 

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Categories: Education Trends, Family Focus, Reading & Learning

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Making Computerized Learning Work Takes WORK

Computerized learning

Having built a career in the world of education and computerized learning, I have always tried to maintain a healthy, objective skepticism towards what I do. When it comes to professional integrity, my top priorities are ensuring that the solutions I work with are developed and vetted based on reliable research, and that these solutions are delivering real results for educators and students.

So, which computerized learning systems work and which ones don’t? Given how differently organizations formulate and interpret the numbers, it’s challenging to get at a singular accurate answer. I know for a fact that all too often schools and districts implement these computerized learning solutions—with the best of intentions—and find that they don’t work as promised. Why?

Quite simply, making these solutions work takes work. They are not “plug and play,” nor are they designed to be a one-size-fits-all magic bullet. Computerized solutions—Fast ForWord® and Reading Assistant™ among them—take careful planning, hours of professional development, and a deep staff and leadership commitment to following implementation protocols.

These systems do not do the work of teachers; they are tools to supplement teacher instruction and inform educators’ decisions.  They are not, nor were they ever meant to be, a substitute for highly qualified educators. But when implemented and used correctly, computerized learning systems can and do help educators identify and address individual student needs and deliver results.

Scientific Learning offers an entire library of success stories and research, as well as independent reviews that demonstrate product effectiveness. But look at every single success and behind it you will not just find a product. You will find that the people using that product held a deep commitment to following the plan and making it work.

In conclusion, we must realize that none of these are new arguments. Even 10 years ago when computer-based learning was still very much in its infancy, researchers knew that these systems should not be expected to work on their own; they need to be embedded within great instructional practices. For a look back at key e-learning principles that still stand strong today, read the 2000 article, Changing How and What Children Learn in School with Computer-Based Technologies, by Roschelle, Pea, Hoadley, Gordin and Means.

Another Resource:

Technology and Education Achievement:  http://abc-article.co.cc/technology/technology-and-academic-achievement/

Related Reading:

Video Games: A New Perspective on Learning Content and Skills

Can You Predict Student Reading Growth?

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Categories: Education Trends, Fast ForWord, Reading & Learning, Reading Assistant

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