We Asked the Fast ForWord Experts About Back to School

Aug 23, 2017 by Carrie Gajowski, MA
Share page with AddThis

Fast ForWord creative ideasWe asked our implementation experts (also known as Professional Development Managers) about what they see in classrooms across the country, how you all are motivating your kiddos, and their top piece of advice for you this year. I was most excited about the story at the end! 

Underperforming Student Success Strategies

Nov 15, 2016 by Eric Jensen, Ph.D.
Share page with AddThis

eric-jensenWhen students come to school every day, here's their question to teachers: are you on my side or not? Are you a friend or a foe? Are you an ally or adversary?  See what practical classroom activities Dr. Eric Jensen recommends to build relationships and get results with your students -- you'll see their progress skyrocket. 

5 Tips For Success from Your Fellow Educators

Nov 18, 2014 by Hallie Smith, MA CCC-SLP
Share page with AddThis

NCOL 2014Customers from across the country – and even China – came together in Dallas, TX, to share and learn from others the best tips for success with Fast ForWord and Reading Assistant. Here are 5 tips you can learn from them!

Inside the Brain of a Struggling Reader [Infographic]

Sep 16, 2014 by Hallie Smith, MA CCC-SLP
Share page with AddThis

When a child struggles to read, we look to factors such as socioeconomic status or access to books. But brain differences are also part of the equation and should not be overlooked.

10 Questions to Ask Your Child’s Teacher This Year (Don’t Forget Cognitive Skills!)

Sep 2, 2014 by Norene Wiesen
Share page with AddThis

It’s back to school…again! Your child is getting to know a new teacher and facing a host of new expectations. How can you be sure that you are prepared to help your child get the most from this school year? Getting the answers to these questions can help.

4 Ways to Use iPads in the Classroom

Jun 24, 2014 by Norene Wiesen
Share page with AddThis

Use iPads in Classrooms Getting students creating with the iPad is as easy as knowing what tools are available and imagining how those tools can be used to support classroom learning. Teachers who aren’t sure where to begin can try one of these ideas, easily adapted for learners of different ages.  

The iPad® and Student Engagement: Is There a Connection?

Apr 1, 2014 by Carrie Gajowski, MA
Share page with AddThis

When students at ACS Cobham International School (UK) got iPads, Richard Harrold saw an opportunity. As a lower (elementary) school assistant principal at the school, he had been hearing glowing reports from other educators about students using iPads and seeing remarkable gains. Were the gains real? This is what he found out.

Self-Regulation Strategies for Students With Learning Disabilities

Mar 18, 2014 by Carrie Gajowski, MA
Share page with AddThis

When a student with a learning disability struggles academically, it’s logical to think that the issue is related to the student’s deficit in a specific ability. And while that may be true, there might be more to it. Students with learning disabilities may not know how to effectively work through challenges. Here are 4 self-regulation strategies that can benefit your whole class.

Teach More Vocabulary, Faster, Using the Power of Morphology

Mar 4, 2014 by Norene Wiesen
Share page with AddThis

You can teach your students 10 vocabulary words the usual way – one at a time – or you can teach them 100 vocabulary words with little extra effort. The second approach seems like the obvious choice, and in Dr. Tim Rasinski’s recent webinar, Comprehension – Going Beyond Fluency, he makes the case for greater adoption of the accelerated approach.

Flipping the Classroom for Students With Learning Disabilities

Feb 11, 2014 by Norene Wiesen
Share page with AddThis

For many teachers, the words “flipped classroom” are nothing more than a synonym for having students watch pre-recorded lesson videos at home and then do related assignments – formerly homework – during class time. There’s no doubt that that is exactly what the flipped classroom typically looks like on the surface. But when flip teaching is done right, what matters is that it uses time differently and more effectively, in ways that can profoundly benefit all learners, including students with learning disabilities.

Pages